Michigan STEM Partnership, Mobile Technology Association of Michigan to Host STEM Career Showcase at Technology in Motion Detroit

Diversity of STEM-related career opportunities for high school and college students, career changers to be showcased with interactive exhibits, panels, expert speakers, videos

STEM logo from Crain's with MTAM & PartnershipThe Mobile Technology Association of Michigan (MTAM), the Michigan STEM Partnership and Technology in Motion (TIM) announced that they have joined forces to create a STEM Career Showcase at the inaugural TIM Detroit conference and trade show. TIM Detroit, scheduled for Sept. 6-8, 2017, will feature a STEM Village of exhibitors for the duration of the event, as well as STEM-focused speakers, panels and activities on September 7th from 1:00 – 7:00 p.m.

“Careers in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) fields are the fastest-growing careers in the global marketplace and they’re also the most in-demand jobs in Michigan,” said Gary Farina, Executive Director at the Michigan STEM Partnership. “Partnering with MTAM and TIM Detroit on the STEM Career Showcase provides a real-world platform for the Michigan STEM Partnership and the Mobile Technology Association of Michigan to demonstrate exactly what it takes to prepare the next generation for careers in the automotive and technology fields.”

TIM Detroit is a three-day event co-produced by Crain Communications and MSX International, and will serve as the intersection of automotive and technology, highlighting the rapidly-growing interest in connectivity, autonomy, mobility and the shared economy. It will highlight the future of mobility by showcasing the most advanced technology for the next generation of vehicles. TIM Detroit will also include on-site events, product exhibitions, presentations and panel discussions   featuring leading innovators in transportation and technology.

“It is not only critical that we engage students in a program like this to clearly demonstrate the opportunities and benefits of working in the automotive and technical industries and living in Detroit, but many of our sponsors, participants and exhibitors coming to TIM Detroit have a direct need for highly trained, technically skilled and creative workers,” said Dave Graff, Senior Vice President of Global Sales for MSX International.

The STEM Careers Village will feature exhibits from companies seeking to increase awareness among students, parents,   educators and career-changers on the mobility / connected technologies career opportunities that exist for students and career-changers to pursue, and the type of education and skills required to succeed in such careers. The STEM Career Showcase will feature keynote speakers, panel discussions, videos from STEM professionals, interactive opportunities and more to increase enthusiasm about pursuing STEM-related careers.

Topics to be discussed during the STEM Career Showcase event include:

  • How to find a STEM job in today’s marketplace
  • Solving the STEM talent problem through diversity
  • The STEM gender gap and how to close it
  • The importance of STEM to Michigan’s economy
  • Increasing the availability of STEM training

MTAM Executive Director, Linda Daichendt indicates, “Skilled STEM talent is in exceptionally high demand – nationally, and in Michigan – particularly in fields associated with mobility and connected technologies. Studies have shown that Michigan will have a need for 100,000 additional people in these fields by 2020. Therefore, it is critical that we educate students and those seeking second or alternative careers about the lucrative, challenging and fulfilling career opportunities available to them once they’ve completed STEM-related training programs so they will make the choice to pursue these fields.”

Students from local universities and high schools will be given complimentary attendance for the STEM @ TIM event and will be invited to attend and participate in event demonstrations. They will also be able to view the TIM Pitch competition – where start-ups showcase their innovations to industry leaders – as well as the Hack-a-thon, which will challenge software experts to solve specific tasks. The TIM Pitch Competition will take place starting Sept. 6 at 3:00 p.m. and continue into Sept. 7, when the winners are announced. The Hack-a-thon will take place throughout the event.

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MI STEM Partnership co-produces STEM careers event at ‘Technology in Motion: Detroit’ exhibition

This article originally appeared in the TIM Detroit blog on July 19, 2017


STEM_photo-1Every industry is becoming increasingly reliant on STEM-related jobs, which more often than not outnumber the amount of applicants available for them — especially in Michigan.

“We already have about 15,000 connected tech-related jobs in the state going unfilled,” said Linda Daichendt, executive director of the Mobile Technology Association of Michigan (MTAM). “If we don’t find a way to solve this problem by getting our students, and those seeking second or alternative careers, interested in filling these jobs, then the jobs will go elsewhere, companies will leave, and Michigan and its economy will be left behind.”

Most importantly, STEM support doesn’t just resolve an issue, but creates opportunities. Research conducted by Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) and MTAM indicates that every connected technology-related job created in Michigan also creates 6.54 additional jobs in the state, making it the highest job creation factor in the state. Michigan currently has multiple growing STEM industries, including mobility/connected transportation, connected health, smart manufacturing, smart cities, defense and cybersecurity.

The inaugural Technology in Motion (TIM) mobility exhibition seeks to be part of these efforts by partnering with the Michigan STEM Partnership and MTAM to produce the STEM Careers Showcase. This program will be held from 1-7 p.m. on Sept. 7 in the TIM Detroit exhibition hall and will cater to students, parents and educators. The showcase will focus on increasing awareness about STEM careers, with a goal of increasing student STEM education participation and student pursuit of STEM careers. The event will also provide information to parents and educators about the opportunities available to students due to substantial business and industry demand for STEM talent; research shows that parents are extremely influential on students’ education and career choices, and teachers need to understand what employer needs are to prepare students for jobs.

One of the main features of the showcase will be a series of expert talks and panel discussions on topics such as how to find a STEM job in today’s marketplace; solving the STEM talent problem through diversity; and the importance of STEM to Michigan’s economy. In addition, the entire TIM Detroit exhibition will be open to participants, allowing them to explore booths from prominent STEM-focused companies like General Motors, Lear Corporation and Cisco. There will also be a designated “STEM Village” on the floor that will include interactive exhibits and STEM career information hosted by various organizations.

Support for STEM development at events like TIM Detroit is crucial. “Our educational institutions are suffering a lack of resources and teachers able to provide this training to today’s students, which puts our students at a disadvantage,” said Gary Farina, executive director of the Michigan STEM Partnership. “Therefore, we encourage, and will support, efforts designed to expose students to opportunities to explore these careers and to interact with industry professionals who can share their expertise and experiences.”

To find out more about the STEM Careers Showcase, visit the STEM page on the TIM Detroit website. To buy a ticket for the event, you can purchase a $10 exhibition ticket for Thursday, Sept. 7, or the $25 three-day pass if you’d like to come on other days as well. For more information about getting involved, reach out to MTAM at (248) 470-3257 or email info@GoMobileMichigan.org.

Michigan can become the world leader in STEM education and careers

This article is a from a news release issued by the Michigan Department of Education.


Michigan has the potential to become a world leader in STEM education and careers, due to strong talent, educational institutions and thriving industries, according to a report released today by the MiSTEM Advisory Council*.

“Having top talent means preparing our students early for in-demand careers to make Michigan the center for brainpower and 21st Century innovation,” Governor Rick Snyder said. “I appreciate the council for its hard work to make sure we are on the right path, and look forward to their continued partnership as we make Michigan a leader in STEM.”

The MiSTEM Advisory Council, which was created in 2015 by the state Legislature to develop recommendations to promote STEM education and careers around the state, released its first report highlighting Michigan’s strengths in science, technology, engineering and math while making recommendations for improvements.

“Every student being able to take STEM programming is a key strategy in building Michigan into a Top 10 education state in 10 years,” said State Superintendent Brian Whiston. “Let’s take this opportunity and put it into gear.”

The MiSTEM Advisory Council includes business, higher education, K-12 education, and philanthropic leaders, as well as state legislators.

“These recommendations are the next step in Michigan’s ongoing effort to ensure we prepare every child and worker to obtain good-paying career opportunities and achieve their dreams right here in Michigan,” said state Senator John Proos, R-St. Joseph, a member of the council. “I have long supported STEM education, because these rigorous areas of study are vital to our future. I will continue to encourage schools to actively engage with job providers to design and implement curriculum that meets our skilled workforce needs and ensures all Michigan students are given a path to success.”

The council’s approach to STEM in Michigan focus on four key efforts including:

  • creating a new culture of STEM
  • strengthening the educator pipeline
  • integration between business and education
  • ensuring quality STEM experience

“I am excited about using the arts and creativity to attract under-represented students to STEM programs; to make it relevant to all students and not just those already interested in STEM,” said state Rep. Leslie Love, D-Detroit, a member of the council. “It’s infinitely more exciting, especially in an increasingly inter-disciplinary and digital world.”

The MiSTEM Advisory Council will publish recommendations annually. This year’s full report is attached.


*MiSTEM Advisory Council

The 11-member council was created by Governor Rick Snyder in 2015 to advise the governor, legislature, the Department of Talent and Economic Development, and the Department of Education with recommendations designed to improve and promote innovation and collaboration in STEM education and prepare students for careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The council shall recommend a statewide strategy for delivering STEM education-related opportunities to pupils and objective criteria for determining preferred STEM programs and make recommendations to the governor and the legislature no later than March 1, 2016.