FCA is Latest Addition to Our STEM Career Video Showcase

STEM video initiative logoThe STEM Careers Video Showcase is a joint initiative from the MI STEM Partnership, the Mobile Technology Association of Michigan, and Inforum. It features self-produced videos from STEM professionals across a wide diversity of industries throughout Michigan.

Visit the Showcase on our website to see the latest addition to the showcase from Laura Porrone Cavitt, an Electrical Engineer at FCA.

Advertisements

MI STEM Partnership Announces Partnership with Newton’s Road of NW Michigan

Newton's Road Logo-TMThe Michigan STEM Partnership is happy to announce a partnership with Newton’s Road of Northwest Michigan. Partnership activities will focus on the sharing of best practices, developmental initiative designs, resources and STEM events and opportunities. Both organizations expect that this collaboration will provide transferable benefits to both organizations and the communities they serve.

Newton’s Road has a rich legacy of community involvement and works with regional partners to leverage resources to increase student access to outstanding learning opportunities in the field of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM Education).  For more information on Newton’s Road go to http://www.networksnorthwest.org/main-site.

Additional information on this partnership will be available soon.

TEALS: Computer Science in Every High School Comes to Michigan

Teacher and Students

Teacher and Students from the Detroit International Academy of Young Women

TEALS helps high schools build and grow sustainable computer science programs through partnerships between classroom teachers and tech industry volunteers. They work as a team to deliver Computer Science education to students who would otherwise not have the opportunity to learn CS in their school. Over two years, the classroom teacher gradually takes over the responsibilities of teaching the course without volunteer support. The team-teaching and volunteer system of TEALS creates a strong ripple effect: it empowers teachers who can multiply the impact by providing computer science education to hundreds more students over the years.

TEALS was founded in 2009 by former high school CS teacher and software engineer Kevin Wang and is supported by Microsoft Philanthropies. Our mission is that every student should have the opportunity to study rigorous computer science in high school. You can read more about our vision and pillars here: https://www.tealsk12.org/about/mission/

TEALS is happy to announce that we are currently accepting applications for the 2018-19 school year! Deadline February 26th, 2018. You can click here to start your School Application now, or visit www.tealsk12.org at any time to learn more.

IMG_20180110_090649

Teacher, Vision IT Volunteer and Students from West Side Academy for Information Technology and Cybersecurity

For the 2017-2018 school year, TEALS is currently in 10 schools in Michigan including 8 in the Metro Detroit Area. Here is a list of schools we are working with:

  • Cass Tech High School, Detroit Public Community Schools
  • Renaissance High School, Detroit Public Community Schools
  • Detroit International Academy for Young Women, Detroit Public Community Schools
  • West Side Academy for Information Technology and Cybersecurity, Detroit Public Community Schools
  • Western International High School, Detroit Public Community Schools
    Cornerstone Health + Technology, Metro Detroit
  • Summit Academy North, Metro Detroit
  • Advanced Technology Academy, Metro Detroit
  • East Lansing High School, Lansing Area
  • West Michigan Aviation Academy, Grand Rapids Area

TEALS would like to at least double the number of schools in the Metro Detroit area with a vision of growing into other parts of the state that we can support.

TEALS is holding two information sessions;  education leaders, principals and teachers are welcome to attend.

If you would like to dig deeper into our program, here are some of our materials:

TEALS Program Description (2018-19) – A brief, one-page description of the TEALS program accompanied by a graphical summary of our program impact to date.

TEALS Implementation Guide (2018-19) – Everything you need to successfully implement a TEALS partnership at your school.

TEALS Program Booklet (2018-19) – This guide provides an overview of the TEALS model, volunteer support options, and various curricula options that TEALS supports to help high schools create a CS pathway, from Introduction to CS to AP CS Principles to AP CS A to Advanced Topics and Projects. An overview of each course is in our Schools FAQ as well as the TEALS Implementation Guide. The booklet also provides details on how to apply to be a TEALS partner school.

Detroit-area Middle School Students Can Access Qualcomm Thinkabit Lab at UM

More than 3,000 middle school students a year will be introduced to careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), thanks to a collaboration between Qualcomm Incorporated and the University of Michigan College of Engineering.

These organizations are bringing the Qualcomm® Thinkabit Lab™, a hands-on engineering and career awareness program, into the Michigan Engineering Zone (MEZ), known for its makerspace and high school robotics program.

story-thinkabit-content-2

Fourth graders from the Coleman A. Yound Elementary School learn to program Arduino kits to spin motors in order to design and build their “moving Diorama”. Photo:  Evan Dougherty

“The Thinkabit Lab provides us an opportunity to expose younger students to the world of technology, beginning to crystalize in their own minds what role they may play as technologists, scientists, and engineers,” said Julian Pate, director of the MEZ. “The Thinkabit Lab provides several pathways for that kind of thinking. Our perspective is really simple: exposure is success.”

story-thinkabit-content-5

A view of the Qualcomm Thinkabit Lab.  Photo: Evan Dougherty

 

Youth from more than 60 Detroit public middle schools will have access to the one-day workshops at Thinkabit Lab. For many of these students, the experience will mark their first exposure to STEM careers and engineering. The organizers anticipate an even broader reach to students of all ages in the long term.

“Qualcomm is proud to collaborate with such a strong engineering institution as the University of Michigan and its innovative Michigan Engineering Zone,” said Susie Armstrong, senior vice president of Engineering, Qualcomm Incorporated. “Together, we are bringing our unique Thinkabit Lab program to students and teachers in the Detroit area. We’re excited to expose these students to STEM and other careers and hope to inspire them to become the next generation of inventors.”

Students will engage in Thinkabit Lab’s signature Qualcomm® World of Work (QWOW™) career exploration activities to discover their own unique talents and learn about concepts and careers in STEM fields, such as the Internet of Things, 5G, creative robotics, and invention. They will also engage in unique hands-on engineering experiences, learning basic programming and strengthening their problem-solving, teamwork, and critical thinking skills by designing and building their own robotic inventions.

“I didn’t know that you could use a computer to make things move,” said Tamia Washington, an eighth-grader at Spain Elementary-Middle School, as she used her laptop to control a circuit that could blink or turn a fan.

Bringing the Thinkabit Lab to the MEZ is part of Qualcomm’s efforts to bring its STEM initiative to diverse communities and regions nationwide, helping to close the STEM skills gap. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2015 there were more than 500,000 open computing jobs in the U.S. That same year, only about 60,000 students graduated from U.S. institutions with bachelor’s degrees in computer and information services. This shortage in qualified tech workers is predicted to increase.

This skills gap showcases the need for STEM-related curricula in schools and an overall prioritization of technology education in the U.S. The collaboration with Michigan Engineering aims to inspire students to become inventors and not just consumers; as well as grow an inclusive, diverse workforce to support business growth and help strengthen the region’s economy.

“We are very focused on first providing the Thinkabit Lab experience to Detroit students. We know that STEM education is gaining interest everywhere, but we also lack ongoing opportunities for STEM in Detroit. So, we think it’s a natural partnership between us and Detroit Public Schools Community District as one option on a menu of opportunities that they can offer to their students,” said Haley Hart, a Thinkabit Lab Coordinator who teaches the workshops.

Organizers are also interested in exposing more girls to STEM fields.

“Coding, robotics and engineering is not the future. It’s the now. So that’s what we need to teach,” said Lakia Wilson, a guidance counselor at Spain Elementary-Middle School. “Engineering is a totally new experience for our students. All of our students need the exposure, the opportunity and the access because if not, then they won’t fully understand what they may have the ability to do in life. We don’t want any of our students to be in that pocket. They are our future.”

Professor Alec D. Gallimore, the Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering at U-M, agrees. “We are very pleased to be bringing the Thinkabit Lab to Detroit. Forging a partnership between Qualcomm and our Michigan Engineering Zone will benefit our community and touch thousands of young minds every year,” said Gallimore, who is also the Richard F. and Eleanor A. Towner Professor, an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, and a professor both of aerospace engineering and of applied physics. “With this unique collaboration, we are opening up more opportunities for students in southeast Michigan to gain exposure to STEM disciplines. We hope these experiences will spark a passion for creativity and problem-solving and will ensure an even brighter future for our community.”

BY THE NUMBERS:
  • 3K Detroit area middle school students per year will have access to this Qualcomm Thinkabit lab
  • 60K students graduated from U.S. institutions in 2015 with computer and information degrees
  • 500K open computing jobs in the U.S. in 2015

About MEZ

Located in the University of Michigan’s Detroit Center, the Michigan Engineering Zone (MEZ) is a safe and supportive innovation space where Detroit students acquire the knowledge and tools they need to propel themselves to higher education and careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through challenging and exciting hands-on experiences. Last year, the MEZ received a 250K Google Grant.

The FIRST Robotics teams of Detroit high schools stand center stage at the MEZ. The College of Engineering provides the needed space, equipment, training, and mentoring to assist students in the design, build, and test of their robots for competition. Outfitted with computer labs complete with CAD software, a machine shop, robot testing area, and collaborative workstations, Detroit’s professional engineers and University of Michigan faculty, staff, students, and alumni provide technical training and mentoring within this environment of learning, leadership, teamwork, and fun!

MI STEM Partnership Wins Leadership Award at TIM Detroit 2017

The Michigan STEM Partnership won The Leadership Award at the recent Technology in Motion (TIM) Detroit 2017 event in which the organization participated as a producer of and exhibitor in the STEM Career Showcase.

Michigan’s first STEM Career Showcase, produced by the Mobile Technology Association of Michigan (MTAM) and the MI STEM Partnership took place on Thursday, September 7th at the 1st annual Technology in Motion (TIM) Detroit event.

Featuring exhibits such as Consumers Energy, MI Robotics Institute, MI-Light, MI Science Center, DASI Solutions and many more, the event provided an opportunity for students, parents and educators to get great information about in-demand STEM careers and educational opportunities, as well as to hear expert panelists on topics such as:

  • The Importance of STEM to Michigan’s Economy
  • Solving the STEM Talent Problem Thru Diversity
  • The STEM Gender Gap and How to Close It
  • How to Find a STEM Job in Today’s Market
  • Increasing the Availability of STEM Training
  • STEM Students; Are they prepared for STEM careers?

Panel members included representatives from firms such as:  Ford Motor Company, Birmingham Schools, Oakland University, Education Planning Resources, Workforce Intelligence Network, Consumers Energy, Mobile Technology Assn of MI, Oakland Community College, Lawrence Technological University, MI Science Center, Society of Automotive Engineers, University of MI, ardentCause, New Shore LLC, Sargon Partners, GTB, Moveable Bytes, GE, Strategic Staffing Solutions, Coretek Services, MI Afterschool Partnership, Project Lead the Way, STEM.org, Great Lakes Bay Regional STEM Eco-system, Amy Cell Talent, Robotic Intelligence Software, RIIS and NHacks.

Sponsors for the STEM@TIM event included: MI Afterschool Partnership, Consumers Energy, Oakland Community College, Michigan Film & Digital Media Office Washtenaw Community College and Henry Ford College.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Michigan STEM Partnership, Mobile Technology Association of Michigan to Host STEM Career Showcase at Technology in Motion Detroit

Diversity of STEM-related career opportunities for high school and college students, career changers to be showcased with interactive exhibits, panels, expert speakers, videos

STEM logo from Crain's with MTAM & PartnershipThe Mobile Technology Association of Michigan (MTAM), the Michigan STEM Partnership and Technology in Motion (TIM) announced that they have joined forces to create a STEM Career Showcase at the inaugural TIM Detroit conference and trade show. TIM Detroit, scheduled for Sept. 6-8, 2017, will feature a STEM Village of exhibitors for the duration of the event, as well as STEM-focused speakers, panels and activities on September 7th from 1:00 – 7:00 p.m.

“Careers in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) fields are the fastest-growing careers in the global marketplace and they’re also the most in-demand jobs in Michigan,” said Gary Farina, Executive Director at the Michigan STEM Partnership. “Partnering with MTAM and TIM Detroit on the STEM Career Showcase provides a real-world platform for the Michigan STEM Partnership and the Mobile Technology Association of Michigan to demonstrate exactly what it takes to prepare the next generation for careers in the automotive and technology fields.”

TIM Detroit is a three-day event co-produced by Crain Communications and MSX International, and will serve as the intersection of automotive and technology, highlighting the rapidly-growing interest in connectivity, autonomy, mobility and the shared economy. It will highlight the future of mobility by showcasing the most advanced technology for the next generation of vehicles. TIM Detroit will also include on-site events, product exhibitions, presentations and panel discussions   featuring leading innovators in transportation and technology.

“It is not only critical that we engage students in a program like this to clearly demonstrate the opportunities and benefits of working in the automotive and technical industries and living in Detroit, but many of our sponsors, participants and exhibitors coming to TIM Detroit have a direct need for highly trained, technically skilled and creative workers,” said Dave Graff, Senior Vice President of Global Sales for MSX International.

The STEM Careers Village will feature exhibits from companies seeking to increase awareness among students, parents,   educators and career-changers on the mobility / connected technologies career opportunities that exist for students and career-changers to pursue, and the type of education and skills required to succeed in such careers. The STEM Career Showcase will feature keynote speakers, panel discussions, videos from STEM professionals, interactive opportunities and more to increase enthusiasm about pursuing STEM-related careers.

Topics to be discussed during the STEM Career Showcase event include:

  • How to find a STEM job in today’s marketplace
  • Solving the STEM talent problem through diversity
  • The STEM gender gap and how to close it
  • The importance of STEM to Michigan’s economy
  • Increasing the availability of STEM training

MTAM Executive Director, Linda Daichendt indicates, “Skilled STEM talent is in exceptionally high demand – nationally, and in Michigan – particularly in fields associated with mobility and connected technologies. Studies have shown that Michigan will have a need for 100,000 additional people in these fields by 2020. Therefore, it is critical that we educate students and those seeking second or alternative careers about the lucrative, challenging and fulfilling career opportunities available to them once they’ve completed STEM-related training programs so they will make the choice to pursue these fields.”

Students from local universities and high schools will be given complimentary attendance for the STEM @ TIM event and will be invited to attend and participate in event demonstrations. They will also be able to view the TIM Pitch competition – where start-ups showcase their innovations to industry leaders – as well as the Hack-a-thon, which will challenge software experts to solve specific tasks. The TIM Pitch Competition will take place starting Sept. 6 at 3:00 p.m. and continue into Sept. 7, when the winners are announced. The Hack-a-thon will take place throughout the event.

Girls participation in Computer Science skyrockets past boys

This article originally appeared on the Code.org Medium site and was authored by Hadi Partovi, CEO of Code.org


Ten years ago, just 2,600 female students took the AP Computer Science Exam.

Fast forward to 2017. Over 29,000 female students took an AP CS exam this year, which is more than the entire AP CS exam participation in 2013 when Code.org launched. Though computer science has seen sustained growth year after year, the introduction of AP CS Principles this past school year was the largest College Board AP exam launch in history, and has skyrocketed participation in CS especially among female students and minorities.

Female - Minorities in AP CS

The growth among female students has been incredible, increasing participation in AP CS exams by 135% since 2016. Not to be outdone, underrepresented minorities have increased participation by nearly 170% over last year!

Participation by girls and minorities outpaces the rest

We’ve seen steady improvement in the diversity of AP Computer Science in the four years since since Code.org was launched in 2013, thanks to the collaboration of many partners and the dedicated effort of thousands of computer science teachers. While participation in AP Computer Science is growing as a whole, the greatest gains are among female students and underrepresented minorities, whose representation among exam-takers is increasing each year.

% Female - Minorities in AP CS

Racial diversity in Code.org’s AP Computer Science classrooms exceeds the nation’s average, because of our work in urban schools. While we’re not ready to report aggregate statistics for Code.org’s partner schools, the results we’ve seen from school districts using Code.org are incredible. For example, in Broward County Public Schools, FL, more African American students took AP computer science exams this year than in the entire state of Florida last year, and a significantly higher percentage received a passing grade. Broward County Public Schools also saw record participation by Latinx students, whose participation in AP computer science more than tripled since last year.

Because 70% of students in Code.org CS Principles classrooms indicate they want to pursue computer science after graduation, we are optimistic that these gains will have a downstream impact on diversity in tech at the university and workforce level.

We still have a long, long way to go

Participation in AP Computer Science is still far from balanced — female students still account for only 27% of all students taking AP Computer Science exams and underrepresented minorities make up just 20%. This problem continues through to higher education, where 83% of university computer science majors are men, and into the workforce as well.

Although Code.org has become the most popular curriculum for AP Computer Science, these results are much larger than any one organization, thanks to a community effort by nonprofits, educators, philanthropic efforts by corporations, and even local government support. We should all celebrate the incredible results in the first year of the College Board’s launch of the new AP Computer Science Principles exam.

The future looks even rosier

In grades K-8, Code.org has prepared almost 60,000 teachers to introduce computer science in their classes, and diversity across our classrooms nearly matches that of the overall U.S. population. As these students move to high school, we hope many of them will continue their interests in computer science.

And this summer alone we’re preparing almost 900 new teachers to begin teaching AP Computer Science Principles, expanding access to tens of thousands of students in urban or rural schools which previously had no computer science offering. Our focus on diversity pervades our work, from curriculum, to teacher development, to even government affairs, and we’re excited to see results in the classroom.

These changes wouldn’t be possible without the passion and effort of teachers who have embraced computer science to help open doors for their students. This teacher-led movement continues as more female and underrepresented minority students are trying computer science than ever before!

Together we are changing the face of computing.

Hadi Partovi, Code.org

P.S. There are far too many groups who deserve collective credit that it would be too difficult to list them all. But certainly, I’d like to acknowledge the NSF for the idea for a new AP course, the College Board for making and administering the exam, many different organizations who created curriculum or prepared new teachers, dozens of private philanthropists and corporations who funded the work, and of course thousands of teachers in classrooms. At Code.org we celebrate everybody’s contribution to the movement to give every student in every school the opportunity to learn computer science.

91